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Full text of "Annual report of the Division of Immigration and Americanization"



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COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Board of Higher Education 




Division of Immigration and Americanization 



FIFTY - THIRD 
ANNUAL REPORT 



July 1, 1969 - June 30, 1970 



i 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
THE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 



Winthrop S. Dakin, Chairman - Northampton 
Mrs, Hyman B. UUian, Vice-Chairman -Newton Center 

John Adam, Jr., Worcester Louis M. Lyons, Cambridge 

James T. Curtis, Lowell Roger L. Putnam, Sr., East Longmeadow 

Dr. Gene P. Grillo, Bradford Mrs. William £• Spaulding, Wakefield 

H. Irving Grousbeck, Boston Mrs. Sol W. Weltman, Cambridge 

Dr. Edward C, Moore, Chancellor 

MEMBERS OF ADVISORY COMMISSION TO BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 



Dr. Robert C. Wood, University of 

Massachusetts, Boston 
Pres. Martin J. Lydon, Lowell 

Technological Institute, Lowell 
Dr. Joseph L. Driscoll, Southeastern 



Dr. Neil V. Sullivan, Commissioner of 

Education, Boston 
Pres. James J. Hammond, State College 

at Fitchburg 
Dr. William Park, Simmons College, 



Massachusetts University, No. Dartmouth Boston 
Dr. William G. Dwyer, Board of Regional Dr. William Gaige, Advisory Council 
Community Colleges, Boston on Education, Boston 



BOSTON 



FALL RIVER 



LAWRENCE 



SPRINGFIELD 



WCEC ESTER 



DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

mm office 

Room 208, Tremont Building 
73 Tremont Street 
Telephones 227-0719 
Supervisor of Social Service 
Teofilia K. Tattan 

BRANCH OFFICES 

Si Franklin Street 
Telephone: 672-7762 
District Immigration Agent 
Daniel J. Donahue 

Rooms 308-9, Blakeley Building 
U77 Essex Street 
Telephone? 682-2877 
District Immigration Agent 
Andrew W. Ansara 

State Office Building 
235 Chestnut Street 
Telephone: 73U-1018 
District Immigration Agent 
John A. Mclhnes 

Rooms U01-2, Park Building 
507 Main Street 
Telephone: 755-6815 
District Immigration Agent 
Edmund B. Meduski 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofdi1970mass 



REPORT OF THE 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

FOR THE YEAR 
July 1, 1969 to June 30, 1970 

This year brings to a close fifty-three years of service the Division 
of Immigration and Americanization has been rendering the Commonwealth in 
"bringing into sympathetic and nutually helpful relations the Commonwealth 
and its residents of foreign origin, and generally promoting their assimi- 
lation and naturalization". First as the Bureau of Immigration established 
in 1917; as the Division of Immigration and Americanization under the 
Department of Education 19L9 to 1965; since then it has been under the 
jurisdiction of the Board of Higher Education. The duties and functions 
have remained the same through the years with ever-increasing numbers of 
services and applicants. 

In our five offices, a total of 21,ll±7 individuals were given 
14.8,881 services as the charts at the end of this report show. Our staff 
of seventeen have the district immigration agent and a clerk in each 
branch office and Boston with the bulk of the work has the Supervisor of 
Social Service, a head social worker, four social workers with four 
clerical-stenographer staff. Boston gave 9371 individuals 27,0£l services; 
Fall River 2601 individuals hh9± services; Lawrence 7586 services for 31 7h 
individuals; Springfield 2629 individuals and 1*061 services; Worcester 
5692 services for 3372 individuals. 

The charts at the end of this summary detail the types of cases and 
assistance given in the many problems of persons of foreign origin in 
various phases of the immigration laws; assimilation of the newcomers to 
our land; citizenship and naturalization assistance. 

NATIONALITIES OF OUR APPLICANTS 

This state ranks seventh in numbers of aliens in the United States 
and fourth in numbers of immigrants giving their points of destination 
in the United States. The change of immigration pattern, where not as 
many are coming from the English-speaking countries as Canada, Great 
Britain, and Ireland, reflects on the nationalities of persons seeking 
our assistance. Those services over 600 for applicants born in the 
following roTintries weres 



Italy 


h66h (2819 in Boston) 


Portugal 


ii6U0 (29kl in Fall River) 


United States 


3U50 


Greece 


3h3$ 


Canada 


3397 


Cuba 


2666 


Jamaica 


2381* 


Poland 


231*6 


Ireland 


1656 


Trinidad 


1215 



Dominican Rep. lll|0 



Colombia 


982 


China 


m 


England 


9h2 


Philippines 


900 


Germany- 


899 


Haiti 


891 


Lebanon 


816 


Barbados 


668 


Honduras 


6U2 


India 


6UL 


OUR SERVICES 





The bulk of assistance concerns immigration now being operated under 
provisions of the immigration law of October 3, 1965 which permits a total 
of 170,000 immigrants from the Eastern Hemisphere and a limitation of 
20,000 yearly to each country; an annual quota of 120,000 born in countries 
of the Western Hemisphere. Preferences are allocated to those of the 
Eastern Hemisphere as follows : 

First preference (unmarried sons and daughters of U. S. citizens): 20$ of 

the over-all limitation of 170,000 in any fiscal year; 
Second preference (spouses and unmarried sons and daughters of aliens 

lawfully admitted for permanent residence): 20$ of the over-all limitation 

plus any numbers not required for first pre^ff^eace; 
Third preference (members of the professions or persons of exceptional 

ability in the sciences and arts): 10$ of the over-all limitation; 
Fourth preference (married sons or daughters of U. S. citizens) : 10$ of the 

over-all limitation, plus any numbers not required by the first three 

preference categories; 
Fifth preference (brothers and sisters of U. S. citizens): 2k% of the 

over-all limitation, plus any numbers not required by the first four 

preference categories; 
Sixth preference (skilled and unskilled workers in short supply) : 10$ of 

the over-all limitation; 
Seventh preference (refugees ) : 6$ of the over-all limitation; 
Nonpreference (other immigrants) J numbers not used by the seven preference 

categories . 

Abolition of the national origins quota system greatly benefited the 
Asian countries as well as immigrants from Portugal, Italy, Greece, and 
Yugoslavia, mostly relatives of U. S. citizens or of resident aliens. 
However, the numbers of immigrants have declined from Great Britain, 
Ireland, and Germany because so many of these applicants were subject to 
labor clearance requirements. 

The 1601 petitions we assisted our applicants in filing with the U. S. 
Immigration and Naturalization Service embodied persons under these pref- 
erence categories . Many were for Portuguese, Italian, and Greek parents 
who had come recently to the United States and now were able to petition 
for their adult, unmarried children to join them. Many immigration 
inquiries do come from recent arrivals who are anxious to have all their 
family united, Including the married child and family still left behind. 
After approval of the petitions, an affidavit of support is executed for 



them and in all 3,015 affidavits were attested to by our social workers, 
also commissioned as Notaries Public. This category included affidavits 
made for visitors to the United States, as assurances that they would 
not become public charges during their stay here. 

With the petitions to be filed to establish relationship between 
the petitioner and beneficiary, documents must be furnished, as birth, 
marriage, death, divorce records, and 15U6 translation services account 
for the majority in this phase of services. The more prominent languages 
were Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, Polish, German, Hungarian, Czechoslovak, 
as well as Arabic, Vietnamese, Korean, Serbian, etc. One petition 
concerned a wife and eight children to come from Portugal. The alien had 
waited two years to make the papers so that he would have enough funds for 
the action— $90.00 with U. S. Immigration and, in addition to costs of 
issuance of passports, necessary documents and photos, medical examinations 
and $2^.00 each for visa issuance at the consulate, transportation costs 
were all carefully considered. 

In 1969 of a total of 17,567 Portuguese-born immigrants admitted to 
the United States, 6596 came to Massachusetts. 

However, Cape Verdians, as those from a colony or other dependency 
of another country, allowed only 1% of total of visa numbers of the mother 
country, are limited to 200 yearly quota. This prevents many brothers and 
sisters of persons born there from joining their relatives in the United 
States. Clients inquire frequently as to probability of their sister's 
or brother's coming, as many have been waiting since 1967. 

For brothers and sisters born in Italy, the waiting list is back to 
those with priority of January 1, 1966. This situation has eased and not 
as many relatives are now making petitions for persons in this class j 
whereas for those born in many countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, since 
quotas are available, there are many applications being made. 

OTHER SITUATIONS 

A prerequisite for nonpreference classification is a labor certifi- 
cation or satisfactory evidence that such applicant will not be employed, 
i. e., as parents or minor children of legally resident aliens. 

We have assisted both employers and prospective employees, those 
visiting in the United States aspiring to become residents, in filing 
applications, having filled 225 applications in the past year (ES575A and B). 

Domestic work offers are practically non-existent now as in this 
area the offer from employers promising $80.00 weekly with the prospect of 
waiting one year for such help has discouraged applications. The domestic 
live-in servants were a large part of the immigrants, especially from the 
Latin -American countries and the West Indies. Many of these domestics, 
arriving a few years earlier, have their families now in the United States. 
Our record of 865 forms 1-550 represents the majority of alien applicants, 
endeavoring to have their immediate families join them. 



CHANGE OF STATUS PROBLEMS 

Visitors in the United States who marry U. S. citizens or legal 
residents - visitors desiring to change to students - and visitors who 
are close relatives of citizens or legal residents often want to stay in 
the United States. Being the parent of a citizen permits application as a 
nonquota immigrant and for those or spouses coming from the Eastern Hemis- 
phere, it is possible to adjust in the United States as allowed by immi- 
gration law. The filing of a petition, execution of proper forms, 
including affidavits of support, translation of necessary documents 
are accomplished. 

Qir social workers act as representatives of the applicants at hearings 
in immigration adjustment and deportation cases and last year were present 
at 238 hearings with their clients. 

WESTERN HEMISPHERE IMMIGRATION 

Another large group because either of birth in the Western Hemisphere 
or having entered as seamen and now being married to citizens of the 
United States or legally resident aliens, had to journey to Canada or some 
other country for their visas. After much correspondence, fulfilling 
requirements, they finally obtained consular appointments. The compassion 
of the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service in granting 
extensions of time in voluntary status until appointments were procured 
was gratefully acknowledged. 



I 



Immigrants born in countries of the Western Hemisphere subject to 
the limitation of 120,000 annually this year are confronted with a wait 
to get visas because of the nonpreference clauses. Brothers and sisters 
do not gain preference category for countries of the Ttfestern Hemisphere 
on petitions of their U. S. citizen brothers and sisters, neither do 
professionals, as classified third preference applicants do in the Eastern 
Hemisphere. Instead they are compelled first to get an application 
approved by the Labor Department of a position in a market where their 
skill is required. Because of the situation at home, few labor clearances 
are being given. For those having obtained this action, a wait in the 
quota must follow of over a year for their quota numbers. In cases where 
the offer of employment might have proved acceptable, employers are 
reluctant to sign such offers because need for the employee is usually 
immediate. Parents, spouses, and children of U. S. citizens are the only 
groups exempt from the numerical limitation. The present waiting list 
for a Western Hemisphere immigrant visa is backlogged approximately a year, 

ALIENS IN MASSACHUSETTS 

Aliens registering in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as of January, 
1970, were recorded as 169,125, an increase over last year of 9000. This 
year the U. S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has not been able 
yet to complete the detailed report of nationalities as in past years. 
Classified by c ountry of birth, immigration is more varied today than at 
any other time in U. S. history. i 



IMMIGRANTS TO MASSACHUSETTS 



The figures of total immigration for the year ending June 30, 1970 
wm not be^ailable for months. Preliminary estimates are th ^ there 
will be an increase of some ten or fifteen thousand "Grants cate 
number in many decades. In the past ten years, lltf,0l|6 immigrants came 
STSSsSiuaettB. The latest detailed report for the year ending JiiQe 30, 
1969 shows 19,OU3 with nationalities as follows: 

Immigrants Admitted to Massachusetts 
Year Ended June 30, 1969 - - -19,0143 



Portugal 6^96 

Italy 161U 

Greece 153U 

Canada 1521 

United Kingdom 1023 

Jamaica 661 

Trinidad & Tobago 502 

China (includes Taiwan) U72 

Germany 333 

Haiti 253 



India 231 
Philippines 171 
Colombia lUO 
Cuba H7 
Dominican Republic Jla 
Korea 93 
Yugoslavia IP- 
Mexico 32 
All Other 5595 



Immigrants Admitted to Massachusetts 
the Past Ten Years - lU5,OU6 



1969 
1968 

1967 
1966 

1965 
1961; 
1963 
1962 
1961 
I960 



19,0U3 
19,339 
18,22*6 

15,120 
n,U55 
12,650 
13,571 
11,578 

12,091 
11,953 



Immigrants from Top Ten 
of Each Hemisphere for 
June 30, 1969 
Eastern Hemisphere 
Italy 2U,U65 
Philippines 23,335 
China 21,811 
Greece 19,UU8 
Portugal 17,567 
Gr. Brit. 10,99U 
9,U69 
8,695 
6,823 
6,169 



Yugoslavia 
Germany 
India 
Korea 



Countries 
Year Ended 

Western Hemisphere 
Mexico 1*2,071 
Canada 15,722 
Jamaica 15,252 
Domin. Repub.10,279 
Cuba 8,952 
Trin.&Tobago 7,UU2 
Colombia 6,638 
Haiti 6,U07 
Ecuador 5,173 
Argentina 3,U07 



In the fiscal year 1969, 358,579 immigrants were admitted to the 



United States, 

Of the 358,579 immigrants, 10,000 or more had as place of intended 
residence the following states : 

New York 9k,hP3 

California 71A 8 3 

Illinois 20,U20 

Massachusetts 19,01+3 

New Jersey 18,935 

Texas 17*739 

Florida 13,783 

Pennsylvania 10,0ijl 

PROBLEMS OF THE NEWCOMERS 

In the past year, we sent out 5,551 welcoming letters to the recent 
arrivals in U. S. from abroad. Cur contacts with persons coming to the 
United States recently were 3367. Usual requests were J^*?^ ™ . 
mSing documents to have close relatives join them in **»^ *gf ' 
draft board addresses; change of address cards j ^f^^J^S^ 
often for non-English speaking children; a number of worta^g <^ l £* 
complaints for domestics and others desiring to change jobs . Q ^ a ?™ 
in the United States over one year and wishing to purchase his own home, 
wanted to know if there were any special rates for immigrants . 1 1 

A big problem is that of Spanish-speaking visitors ^Latin- 
American countries who have paid unscrupulous persons speaking ™f* , 

language as much as $700.00 with promise that they ^ * ^_^ 8t * f 
in the United States. In spite of the fact of several programs w ith 
Spanish-speaking groups, a number of newcomers or ^^ J?.™ "'*' 
have paid hundreds of dollars and have been assured "all would be all 
right". Investigation showed no procedures had been ^^^^.^Jf 
of the fact that these promises had been made over a year. Assist ance 
in immigration status was given and referrals made to P™*^^ 8 *^"' 
Hi Italian immigrant had paid $500.00 and been given a receipt for the 
promise that his married daughter would be able to join him + in tne 
United States within a short time. He came to us after ™***££* 
and fortunately by contacting the agent and in his fear of pr osecution, 

he refunded the money although in several instalments, ^J»J£**™* 
paid - in one lump sum. Three other cases involved ?™^ *f^£T 
America. Having entered as visitors and already ^^/^/^ t he 
several years, two had one child each born in the United States and tne 
other couple had two. They were victims of the same S f ^^Seted 
professional who had been paid a goodly sum by each and had ^ c ^f nt 
their immigration cases. Fortunately, we were able to get ^Jf^ST 
visa applications initiated in Canada and it appears ^^^^J^a. 
short time, they may be able to get their visas from the consul in Canada. 

A number of Haitian visitors, several with close relatives in the 
United States, fear return to their native country. 



CUBANS 



As for the Cubans, a number have been able to get to Spain, J*»n 
relatives make the necessary assurance for the parent or spouse with the 



prospect of their admission as parolees. The mechanics of proving the 
relatives' status in the United States and making the affidavit of support 
are comparatively easy. But, for the brother or sister for whom a job 
clearance is required, it now proves to be a most difficult task to get 
proper Labor Department clearances. The relatives in the United States 
must send funds for the full support of those in Spain, A few do come via 
Mexico, .All anxiously await the day when these relatives may join them 
in the United States. 

LEGISLATION 

No new legislation regarding labor clearances was enacted last year 
but the many changes in regulations and removal of blanket pre-certification 
of jobs formerly designated as critical with increased requirements for 
domestics and the economic situation in the state will reflect the fewer 
immigrants of this category. 

Many bills were introduced into Congress regarding immigration. Only 
one was enacted and signed by the President - P. L. 91-225 - on April 7, 
1970. It provides for admission of fiances or fiancees on a temporary basis 
and marriage in the United States within ninety days. This law has helped 
many of the retur ning veterans of military service who could not afford to 
return to marry. Already we have assisted thirteen applicants and fiancees 
are in Korea, Vietnam, Portugal, Greece, and Canada. 

The second class of nonimmigrants permitted under this law includes 
aliens who have been employed continuously for one year by a firm and who 
seek to enter the United States temporarily to continue work for the same 
employer. This provision helps the American businesses involved in inter- 
national trade. 

Immigration has been and continues to be one of the enormous forces 
in the development of the United States. The changing pattern of immi- 
gration reflected in the type of immigrants now coming to the United States 
is a matter of national interest and still plays a considerable part in 
shaping the country's social, intellectual, and economic life. 

NATURALIZATION - CITIZENSHIP 

In the United States there are some three and a half million permanent 
resident aliens eligible to become naturalized and in Massachusetts some 
over one hundred thousand. Yearly naturalization records have shown a 
comparatively small proportion being naturalized. It is a national trend j 
the year 1969 showed nationally 98,700 naturalized and 1|Q60 in Massachusetts, 
In 1970, 3862 were naturalized in this state. The nationalities of those 
naturalized in Massachusetts for the year ending June 30, 1969 (the latest 
detailed report available) : 



Canada 


ftl 


Italy 


520 


Portugal 


U67 


United Kingdom 


376 


Ireland 


355 


Germany 


252 


Greece 


206 



China , inc • Taiwan 15 8 




Poland 128 

Cuba 12U 

Netherlands 67 

Philippines $9 

Hungary Sh 

Israel 38 

Korea 37 

japan 30 
Denmark,Norway, 
and Sweden 
Yugoslavia 

Jfexico 
All other. 

Total U, 

The records of the past ten years for Massachusetts: 

i960 5 9 ltf> 

1961 6,361; 

1962 5,613 

1963 5,63i± 
196U 5,027 

1965 k> 6 52 

1966 U,30U 

1967 ^596 

1968 U,l50 

1969 U«o6o 

1960A969 U9,5Ij6 
There is no ^ .<^^*\^£^^?^ 



for many 



aliens the reason is procrastination. j^^gJ^JJ^TSTft* 
life being busy and demanding, pat it off until some eroro citd2e n. 
exaasoTSsuddenLy brings home the disadvantag « ' «***^« *^ not 
fctVf ew aliens fail to apply f or i**"??*^™ **Xri5ar with the 
realize they have become eligible for »»*«• S?£t2£d to • 
steps in the naturalization process and hesitate to- get tovoxveo B) g llsb 
procedure they do not understand. Others fear «Jf %«^gS and 
well enough or do not have sufficient knowledge ^ ^•^f^ tug iance 
government. For many, however, ^^f^^^J^^^^T 
to their native land involve an emotional adonstment «* f** ^ 
time is needed to realize that acquiring new ^^^"ttohard facts 
discarding old and dear affections. Whatever tfcp: ?££%££* *## 
show that naturalization is not the quick and easy process w 

assume. 

It appears that the more recently ^^^^ Jf ^^ 8 .,^^ Oar 
apjiLicants for citizenship rather than those ^Jf^^^SdaaB for 
statistics show that in our offices we initiated 1,W> Tj^itSng steps 
naturalization and always encourage and aid applicants -an w— * 
to this end* 

A 1 + 

frr^ticalXy every major city in the CorgBOiwealth has 9vexto& 



classes, specializing in English and citizenship programs to prepare 
applicants for naturalization. The booklet published by this office, 
"The Constitution of the United States of America With Questions and 
Answers in Preparation for Naturalization Examination" is widely distributed 
yearly in the amount of ten thousand and given to each applicant for natural- 
ization. 

Although it is no longer mandatory, 169 persons were aided in filing 
for "Declaration of Intention" which document was required of them for 
examination in professional work, joining unions, or getting some State 
license. Persons applying for certificate of citizenship, having gained 
this right through parentage, often prove intriguing. We helped file 232 
such applications. Cases like that of the Portuguese -born granddaughter 
of a naturalized citizen took much time and correspondence to prove the 
variation in usage of the surname. Search of records to get proof of the 
father's residence prior to his twenty-first birth date involved old records 
with death of persons concerned. Lack of knowledge of vital facts proved 
challenging and great satisfaction followed the successful conclusion of 
the case. Occasions as applying for U, S, passports or civil service jobs 
are often the awakeners to persons to get such documents who complacently 
were sure that knowledge of the parents' naturalization was all that was 
required. Seventeen applicants, residents prior to. 192k, were assisted in 
registry and, with our help in ferreting out old records, schooling, 
insurances, etc., they were able to prove continuous residence, even though 
no record of entry had been located, and became naturalized. Several 
concerned persons who had come to the United States at ages of two or three 
whose parents had never been naturalized were included. The efforts are 
long but satisfaction is realized on elation shown by the person finally 
able to call himself "citizen of the United States" legally, having felt as 
one all the years. 

The apathy of many aliens who are no longer required to be citizens 
for many programs of Federal government, as old age, social security 
benefits, medicaid, etc, as well as ease of travel for alien as well as 
citizen are factors in lack of rush for naturalization and aided by un- 
American propaganda and prevalent demonstrations, 

RECENT CHANGES IN NATURALIZATION LAWS 

An amendment was enacted December 31, 1969 deleting the prohibition 
of naturalization during the sixty-day period preceding a general election. 
Also under recently enacted legislation, the thirty day waiting period 
between filing the petition and being sworn in as a citizen in court may 
be waived in any individual case if such waiver will be in the "public 
interest". The request for the waiver shall set forth all the facts and 
circumstances which the petitioner believes will be in the public interest. 
The District Director of the Immigration and Naturalization Service after 
investigation, if it is satisfactorily established that such waiver will be 
in the public interest, may at his discretion grant this waiver. 



SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 

3ht±he fiscal year ending June 30, 1970, l|06l services were given 
at the Springfield Office for 2629 individuals. Recorded statistics 
indicate that 2629 persons came to us from U9 communities located in the 
four Western Counties of the state. In addition we had correspondence 
from 38 former residents now living in other parts of the country. 

Of the 78 nationalities recorded, the greatest number were Canadians, 
followed by natives of the United States, Jamaica, Italy, Poland, Greece, 
and Ireland. 

Last year 598 letters were sent to the newly arrived immigrants, 
advising them of the services offered by our state and totting them to 
call upon us at any time to help in their adjustment to a new way of life. 
It was quite noticeable this year that in our dealings with some of the 
new immigrants they were finding it difficult to adjust because of the 
generTcut-backs in employment. This meant loss of their positions and 
they Sve found it difficult to accept less skillful e^cp^atgreatly 
reduced salaries . We counseled one gentleman who came to the United 
sSt^fwiS his wife and three children from Mia and within ten days 
of his arrival came to us seeking our advice. He had come to the United 
States having guaranteed employment awaiting him. Upon his arrival he 
fouS that the position would not be available for at least six months. 
He oelieved that his former position would be available to him so he 
decided to return to his former employer and await developments. 

We were very much pleased and proud to be able to assist several 
young men - veterans of the Vietnam War - in filing for naturalization. 
All required immediate attention as they were most anxious to become 
citizens and thus enabled to obtain Civil Service positions. 

Again this year we had several cases of former citizens desirous of 
adiustinf their citizenship status. All were considered to have lost 
theif United iLtes citizeLhip while living abroad either by voting or 
serving in the armed forces of a foreign government. We corresponded u 
theS behalf with the United States State Department and the U. S. fed- 
gration and Naturalization Service to accomplish this end. 

Under the heading of nmmigration, furnishing of ^?»^ ?" the 
largest and most difficult service. Particularly was this true when 
dealing with persons anxious to bring relatives into the United States not 
of the Mediate Relative Category. Not only is the restrictive regulation 
of the United States Labor Department upsetting. to individuals but the 
knowledge of a wait of over one year before Immigrant Visas will be 
available has caused people to voice their displeasure. 

We handled a most extraordinary case this past year which involved a 
ladv. 6£ years of age, a native of Russia who entered the United States in 
December 1968. She'came to visit a brother *,- had not seen in many, . m 
years. After we assisted her in obtaining extensions of *W°^jW> 
she eventually approached us, expressing her desire to remain P™?^ 
in the United States. The necessary applications were prepared arid, btf 
action was taken by the government, she asked to withdraw her application 



for adjustment. She did so upon the request of a son and a daughter, both 
professional people in her country, as they were afraid of reprisals if she 
did not return to them. Her decision was heartbreaking to her brother, an 
elderly gentleman, who looked forward to having a close relative with him 
in his remaining years. 

The attendance at final hearings for naturalization and witnessing 
the joy of these new citizens still excite us. During these troubled times, 
it has been gratifying to witness people who have chosen to adopt our 
country when so many others are denouncing her. 

We are pleased to report continued and mutual cooperation with the 
United States Bnmigration and Naturalization Service of Boston and from 
members of their staff in our city. 

Fe are most appreciative for the complete and cordial cooperation of 
public and private social agencies and from supervisors and teachers of 
Adult Civic Education. 

Local offices of Congressman Boland and of United States Senator 
Brooke have been most helpful when we have called upon them to expedite 
some of our deserving cases and we have reciprocated by assisting many of 
their constituents and giving advice also preparing for them applications 
for naturalization, immigration, travel, and change of status. 

WORCESTER OFFICE 

Statistics for this fiscal year show 5692 services of routine and 
many "not so routine" matters for 3372 persons. Some forms and procedures 
used for years have been revised by the United States inraigration and 
Naturalization Service, as well as the U. S, Department of Labor and 
Manpower Administration. Public Law 91-225* enacted by Congress and signed 
by the President on April 7, 1970, pertains to fiances of citizens and to 
intracompany transfers. As is true in many cases of dealing with people 
who have problems, they have feelings of anxiety and expectancy in any new 
situation and this is so even in dealings with repeat clients whom the 
Worcester office has served for the past four decades. Relatively minor 
matters seem crucial especially to newcomers in a new land. Understanding 
the situation and giving adequate service and explanation result in 
adjustment in many such problems. 

Strange as it seems, Worcester's newest immigrants are not immigrants 
as suchj that is, 85 per cent of this Spanish-speaking group are Puerto 
Ricans, being United States citizens from birth. Another 10 per cent are 
Cubans and there is a smattering of Colombians, Mexicans, and others from 
various Central American nations. They have grown in number from a few 
families ten years ago to between 1,500 and 2,000 persons today and it is 
estimated there will be at least a 5*000 Spanish-speaking population in this 
area in two years. We've collaborated with the staff of the government- 
sponsored Spanish center with cases. They come into the office with clients 
for our multi number of services and forms, particularly the Cuban refugees 
for permanent residence after living here for two years. The sponsoring 
of relatives in Cuba via Mexico or by the Cuban Refugee Center, Miami, 
Florida, is another frequent service. 



.Another immigrant group has an unique problem, English rather than 
Greek has been approved for use in the Divine Liturgy by the Greek Orthodox 
Archdiocese of North and South America. The pastor of the Greek church 
states that it will be more difficult to make the change in this city and 
in New England because a second wave of immigration is going on with recent 
arrivals favoring Greek in contrast to the second generation of the earlier 
wave in the 1910»s preferring English. The problem may be resolved by 
alternating services in Greek and English from week to week or getting a 
second priest. 

Actually, at least two other nationality groups, Italian and Polish, 
have the same situation of religious functions due to increased immigration. 
Since the fifth preference for Italy, that is for brothers and sisters of 
U. S. citizens and their families, improved to a four year wait, many more 
of them have been arriving in this area. We've had a banner year for the 
office, completing sixty-one Polish invitations for permanent residence and 
visitors • 

The Agent attended the annual community resources orientation 
conference, titled "The New Worcester People and Services". The main 
speaker, a university history professor, speaking on "The Background of 
the New Worcester-Origins of Its People", brought out the fact that in the 
I960 census hS% of the people in Worcester were of foreign stock in 
comparison with UO/5 for the state, and he discussed at least 18 ethnic and 
nationality groups that immigrated to, settled, and developed this area. k 
In a group discussion, the Agent explained the functions of our Division, 
the role we've played and our continuing to perform in this picture since 
the inception of our office. 

In the short span of time since I960, the "Latins" have been added 
to these major groups and, most likely within the century from now, other 
groups will settle here for the mutual benefit of all parties, even though 
assimilation has its inherent problems. 

LAWRENCE OFFICE 

The Lawrence office completed the fiscal year ending June 30, 1970 
with 7586 services given. This is an increase of 32lj. over the previous year 
and is a record high for this office. Three thousand one hundred seventy- 
four individuals were served. 

The dominant theme this past year was one of frustration. Western 
Hemisphere families found themselves separated merely because one of the 
children had the misfortune to turn twenty-one immediately before visas were 
issued to the rest of the family. All too frequently, this youngster had 
just finished school and had never had work experience, thus making him 
ineligible for a labor certification. If, by some miracle, he did get 
certified, he could expect a wait of one to one and one -half years before 
his turn on the waiting list could be reached. The prospective employer in 
the United States would have to be a very sympathetic person to hold the job k 
open that long. 

We have spent many hours trying to explain to clients the var ious 



ramifications and complications produced by the excessive restrictions that 
Congress has imposed, especially on Western Hemisphere immigration. They 
cannot understand the "why" of these restrictions because "protection of 
the American labor market » is not involved in about 90% of these cases, they 
say. Our only answer is usually a lame, "that's the law". 

Turning elsewhere, however, the picture seems somewhat brighter. We 
were able, for example, to assist many more American citizens in bringing 
their immediate relatives to the United States from countries outside the 
Western Hemisphere, Recent legislation passed during the latter part of 
the fiscal year now permits fiances of American citizens to enter the 
United States, and former servicemen who served in Vietnam and elsewhere 
have begun to come to our office to send for their intended brides. 

This office is continuing to assist increasing numbers of appli cant,s 
for naturalization. Many Cuban refugees have now become e3is iM - e for 
naturalization and are most anxious to identify themselves with the United 
States, By becoming American citizens, they feel they are ripping away 
the last vestige of misery imposed upon them by Castro-Communism. 

As in past years, this office continues to maintain good relations on 
behalf of our clients with the various private and public agencies both in 
this country and abroad. 

We greet each newcomer to this area with a welcoming letter, offering 
our facilities when needed. 

Translations from Arabic, French, Italian and German documents for 
both this office and the Boston office are continuing at a brisk pace. 
Through our relationship with the various area agencies, we are able to 
refer individuals coming to this office with problems other than immi- 
gration or citizenship to the proper resources. 

This office is continuing to benefit from the services of one and 
sometimes two young ladies from the Neighborhood Youth Corps. These girls 
have been most helpful to us with filing and other routine tasks, thus 
relieving the clerk or the agent for other duties. 

Although our work is sometimes beset with frustrations, the satis- 
faction we derive when clients thank us for our assistance and encourage- 
ment does compensate us for our efforts. 

FALL RIVER OFFICE 

The Fall River Office completed the fiscal year ending June 30, 1970 
with a total of U,U91 services rendered to clients. 

Two thousand six hundred one individuals were rendered services 
dealing in citizenship, immigration, and personal problems. These indi- 
viduals came from thirty-eight separate localities throughout Southeastern 
Massachusetts and represented firty-three different nations. 

Of the communities served by this branch office, the city of Fall River 
leads the list of clients with the city of New Bedford ranking second. This 
District Agent visits New Bedford one day a week and, as usual, encounters 



a heavy workload on that single day. 

I must also state that this District Agent was ill a good portion of 
the past fiscal year and the office was maintained by the Clerk. 

This District Agent, while a patient in the Lawrence General Hospital, 
encountered a hospital dietician with an immigration problem, due to the 
lacHhe^as a third preference immigrant awaiting a visa number chargeable 
to Ireland. She had l labor certification and a pending petition* however, 
£• did not make application for adjustment of/tatus. I «- "*^ 
contacted Mr. Ansara of the Lawrence office and am happy to say that her 
Migration problem was straightened out and she was allowed to depart from 
the United States on August 7, 1970 to marry her fiance on Ireland. 

The bulk of the workload in the Fall River branch off ice "ngrtatf 
Emigration problems, citizenship problems, and adjustment «?**£»»»' 
Also we writfletters to local, state, and f eder M«*"*2S3t 
with the Department of State and with Horeign Service Offices throughout 



the world. 



The ethnic background of Southeastern Massachusetts is now pwdomi 
nately Portuguese with thousands of new immxgrants having e^ere d this 
locale in the past five years and continuing to do so at a fast pace. 
These immigrants have strong family ties and numerous immigration ana 
citizenship problems. 

The Immigration Act of October 3, 1965 has eased J^^JjS^ ' 
with the result that the leading ethnic group remains ^^J*f w * ve 
great influx of Chinese in this- community. Ms Chinese ^fJ^fJZ 
was brought about by the Chinese Confession Act, whereby they ;«*•"£ 
their toe identity and therefore are eligible to send *f «^pouse* 
and children. Chinese confession cases in this area have been numerous. 

With the introduction of the new ^ance/Fiancee Act, this^of f ice 15^ 
encountering new applicants. The Act entails a great saving to tne una. 
States citizen in completing the petition* 

This Branch Office of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts ^^if fla 
with pride at its statewide program of sympathetic ^/ Bt ?^LJSJ l 
assistance to United AfetfaM ei*i«w* *od residents of foreign origan. 



STATISTICJL detail 



FISCAL YEAR 7/1/69 - 6/W70 



INFORMATIO N 
Booklets, .forms, Blanks 

Ci tiz enship " 

Immigratio n • """" "' 
Tr avel — ' 
Other "" ' ' 



Service 



211 



Given 



115" 



FORMS FILLED - 

Change of Address (AK-11J 



6119 



Con. Biographic Form (DSP37oT" 
Visa Reg. (FS-1*97 & k9U) " 
Imm. Visa Application (FS-^10)" 
Representative Reg. (G-28) 
Alien Registration :(I-53)~ 
Dup. Alien Reg. Card (l-90" 



Visa Pet. Temporary Help (I-29BJ 

Relative Petition -(1-130) " 

Reentry Permit (l-131> 

Skilled Labor Pet. (I-lJoJ 



W 



TW 



50 



Unrelinquished Dom.(I-191) 

Per. to Reenter after Dep. (1-212) 5" 



Pet. to Classify Status of Fiancee" 

(I-129F) 8 
Notice of Filing Brief (I-290B) ~ 



Foreign Police Clearance (I-J$8k1 ET 

Reg. for Citizenship (1-1*85) 
Perm Res. Section 2li£ (1-1*85)" 
Cuban Adjustment (l-l*85A) 
Tern. Change of Status (T-5o£J 
Ext. Visitor Stay (1-539) 



T87 
"195" 



Verif. of Legal Entry (1^0 
Assurance ^y U.S. for Refugee 

Escapee (1-591) 
Pet. Under Orphan Act (1-600) 
Waiver of Excludability ( 1-601. 
Exchange Student Waiver (1-612) 
Other Imm. Forms - "" 

Declaration of Int. (N-300)~ 

Petition for Nat. (N-UOO) ~~ 

Repatriation (N-Uoi) 
Pet. 



for Nat'l Child (N-ZJ02, 
Veri. Military Service )N-U26J 
Dup. Certificate (N-565) 



"EE&T 



T 



Citz. Verification Abroad (N-577; 

Info, from Records (N-585) ^5 

Deriv. Cert. Application (N-600) Tl? 

Other Naturalization Forms ^o" 



PAGE TOTAL 



121*86 



IT 



182 



52 



101 



IF 



210F 



2W 



2336 



Tiur 



77 



2181 

— ST 



29 



29 



807 



T 



"BJ 



7 



'W 



U 



173 



11 



w 



3 



3126 



31 



Tar 



19 



DFFICES 4- ALL OFFICES 



3150 



75" 



20 



T 



71 



19 



1 



TIT 



IT 



28 



5262 



7 



>0 



U3T 



T2 



22 



17,091 



17157 
281* 



~W 



1,973 



513 



XToT 



287 



19 



10 



39 



3061 



1 



TBT 



"HoT 



¥ 



^2 



126 



kl9h 



28,129 



8 

CO 

o 

PQ 



EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 
Affidavit of Support^ 
Affidavit of Facts 



1*2*2 



2272 



Certificate of Identity 



¥ 



U.S.S.R. Russian Assurance 
Polish Assuranc e 
Cuban Assurance 
Other Notarial 



35" 

"S2" 



Biographic Inf. (G^325) 

(G-32*AT 



W 



"H22" 



Military Biographic (G-325B) 
Labor Clearance (ES-575A & Bj 



H71 



132 



OTHER SERVICES 

Change of Status 



Appearance at Hearings 
Interpretation & Trans." 

Letters^ ~" 

Others " 



8113 



230 



I 



1*19 

""ST 






796 



"25T 



117 

T 



IF 



101 

125" 



102 



IT 



U28 
""6T 



130T 

5900 



NEWCOMER INTERVIEW 



2200 



PAGE 
FIRST PAGE 


TOTAL 
TOTAL 


GRAND 


TOTAL 




■ 





121*86 



27051 



IF 



10 



133 



W 



W 



a 



e 



3U2 



e 

E-i 
CO 
W 

o 

p 



\113 



7 



109 



"ST 



21 



723 



29T 



17 



3T 



133 



101 



110 



1388 



328" 
"35" 



TST 



5i8 



1365 
3126 



UU91 



1132 



90 



1U0 



232U 

5262 



7586 



387 



39 



as 



271 



1000 
3061 



uo6i 



537 



sr 



77 
w 



238 



5692 



s 

Eh 



6,532 

ioiu 



133 



T 



67 



10 

"827' 



iT^r 



79B" 
7 
"2^" 



10,853 



832 

"235" 



"EST 



8O10 



12? 



3,367 



li;98 20,752 
U19U I 28,129 



kQ,m 



TOTAL 



! 



1. 
2. 
3. 
k. 
5. 
6. 

7. 
8. 
9. 

10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
11*. 
15. 
16. 

17. 
18. 

19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23. 
2k. 

25. 
26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 

33. 
3k. 

35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
Uo. 

la. 

k2. 

U3. 
kh. 
U5. 
U6. 

1*7. 
1*8. 

1*9. 
50. 

51. 
52. 
53. 
5U. 



Albania 
Algeria 
Antigua" 
Arabia 




Argentina 
Armenia(R-Tj 

Aruba 

Australia 

Austria 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Belgium 

Bermuda 

Bolivia 

Brazil * 

Br. Guiana 

Bulgaria 

Canada 

Ceylon 

Chile 

China 

Colombia 

Congo 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Cyprus 

Czech. 

Danzig 

Denmark 

Dom. RepT 

Ecuador 

Egypt 

El Salvac 

England 

Etonia 

Finland" 

Formosa 

France 

Germany 

Ghana 

Greece 

Guatemala 

Haiti _ 

Honduras 

Hong Kong 

Hungary. 

Iceland 

India 

Indonesia 

lean 

Iraq 

Ireland 

Israel 

Italy 



55. 

56. 
57. 
.58. 
59. 
60. 
61. 
62. 

63. 
6k. 

65. 
66. 

67. 
68. 

69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 

73. 
flu 

75. 
76. 
77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 
81. 
82. 
83. 
8U. 
85. 
86. 

87. 
88. 

89. 
90. 

91. 
92. 

93. 
9k. 
95. 
96. 
91. 
98. 

99. 
100. 
101. 
102. 

103. 
10U. 

105. 

106. 

107. 
108. 





BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 

THNIC AND 


SPRING 
LAWRENCE FIELD 

NATIONALIST f statist: 


WORCESTER 
CS 


_ 


Jsraaica 


1756 


5 


19 


U93 


111 


238U 


Japan 


129 


10 


37 


35 


17 


22S 


Jordon 


2iJ 


tfS 


11 


2? 


9 


71 


Kenya 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Korea 


100 


7 


27 


U5 


59 


23» 


Latvia 


9k 


k 


3 


- 


- 


101 


Lebanon 


217 


k2 - 


kW 


U9 


70 


bi6 


Liberia 


29 


— 


2- 


2 


- 


33 


Libya 


3 


- 


nv 


1 


2 


6 


Lithuania 


213 


■s 


52 


1 


101 


367 


Macau 


3 


- 


-r 


tm 


• 


3 


Malaya 


at 


- 


as 


** 


mm 


« 


Malta 


ts 


• 


- 


at 


- 


- 


Manchuria 


• 


• 


— 


- 


- 




Mexico 


Six 


17 


2M 


15 


25 


125 


Monaco 


27 


« 


- 


— 


•A 


27 


Montserrat 


252 


- 


- 


- 




252 


Morocco 


; 33 




7 


l£ 


i 2 


5U 


Netherlands 


) 79" 


7 


j 


s 


37 


lib 


New Zealand 


3 


1 2- 




2 


; 5 


12 


Nicaragua 


Zil 


— 


«B - 


1 


1 


U3 


Norway 


33 


69 


- 


u 


13 


119 


Other Countri 


?s 19b 


5 


5 


21 


U 


233 


Pakistan 


10 


SB 


7 


2 


20 


39 


Palestine 


"28 ' 


• 


10 


"6 


- 


iiii 


Panama 


215 


3 


13 


55 


17 


303 


Paraguay 


19 


_ 


•M 


u 


- 


23 


Peru 


191 


3 


i5 


9 


9 


137 


i^niiippines 


1*96 


231 


58 


35 


80 


900 


Poland 


' ii6it 


59 


289 


273 


561 


23U6 


Portugal 


1156 " 


291*7 


1*37 


58 


U2 


kbkO 


Puerto Rico 


UB 


2- 


5 


3 


- 


50 


Romania 


10 




6 


7 


I* 


131 


Saudi Arabia 


- 


- 


_ 


m 


- 


- 


Scotland 


■ - 9h 


1 


1XL 


50 


37 


223 


So. Africa 


2 


3 


1 




3 


15 


Spain 


173 


20 


19 


2& 


36 


26b' 


St. Lucia 


6 


~ 




mm 


it* 


6 


Sudan 


3 


«. 


5 


- 


m 


b 


Sweden 


10. 


2 


1 


5— 


u 


95 


Switzerland 


41" 


1 


23 


«M 


7 


72 


Syria 


. 93 


2 


29 


3 


25 


152 


Thailand 


2k 


& 


3 


it 


3 


36 


Trinidad 


USk 


at 


1 


lit 


6 


1215 


Turkey 


151 


m 


6i 


9 


77 


298" 


Ukraine 


19 


- 


2 


6 




27 


U *o.a »rU 


.. lite 


It 


U3 


5o 


1 56 


33« 


United States 


1623 366- 


215 


UK 


766 


3U5o 


Uruguay 


kl 


- 


- 


63 


7 


117 


Venezuel a 


55 


1 


Hi 


3 


10 


63 


Vietnam 


20 


2 


9 


«r 


2 


33 


Wales 


5 


- 


2 




1 


"" 8 


W.Indies(othe: 


28U 


11 


1 


U2 


1 


339 


Yugoslavia 


155" 


•* 


31 


12 


5o 


2UB 


TOTALS 


27,051 


U,l*91 


7,506 


ii,06l . 


5.692 


J18.88I 





BOSTON 
6/30/70 


FALL 

RIVER LAWRENCE SFRINGFIEID 

LOCALITIES 


WORCESTER 
JES - All 


TOTAL 


Fiscal Tear 7/1/69 - 


mas 




OFFI 


Ffices 


Abington_ 


h 


- 


- 


h 


Acton 


21 


- 


If 


«. 


if 


29 


Acushnet 


- 


80 


- 


- 


- 


80 


Adams 


2 


sm 


- 




-* 


2 


Agawam 


1 


s " i" 


63 


«A 


£>h 


Amesbury 


k 


« 


27 


— 


- 


31 


Amherst 


- 


« 


— 


U3 


- 


U3 


Andover 


m 


- 


135 


- 


- 


12*9 


Arlington 


291 


— 


— 


- 


- 


291 


Ashburnham 


- 


— 


— 


- 


3 


3 


Ashland 


3 




«a 


— 


- 


3 


Athol 


k 


m 


- 


- 


a*t 


b 


Auburn 


m 


— 


■B- 


i* 


B5 


85 


Attleboro 


15 


37 


— 


«* 


- 


^ 2 


Avon 


13 


«r , 


- 


•** * 


- 


13 


Ayer 


33 


— 


3 


- 


1 


37 


Barnstable 


18 


- 




i 


- 


18 


Barre 


- 




2 


- 


3? 


Ul 


Bedford 


33 


- 


- 1 


33 


Belchertown 


9 


— 


— 


1 


10 


Bellinghara 


6 


#* 


— 


— 


- 


6 


Belmont 


172 


- 


BB 


- 


* 


172 


Berkley 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Berlin 


2 


- 




- 


h 


6 


Beverly 


99 


•■• 


1 


- 


am 


100 


Billerica 


20 


0T 


28 


k 


- 


52 


Blackstone 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Blanford 


- 


— 


- 


T 


- 


1 


Boston 


1U083 


11 


70 


mtt 


7 


114171 


Bourne 


2 


? 


— 


m 


- 


9 


Boxford 




OS 


17 


ma 


- 


20 


Boylston 


- 


— 


— 


— 


00 


80 


Braintree 


72 


1 




mg 


- 


73 


Bridgewater 


25 


2 


— 


- 


- 


27 


Brimfield 


MB 


- 


— 


i 


- 


5 


Brockton 


260 


9 


11 


- 


- 


288 


Brookfield 


1 


— 


- 


-* 


uo 


ill 


Brookline 


636 


- 


1 


- 


1 


630 


Burlington 


62 


— 


1 




- 


63 


Cambridge 


1735 


_ 


1& 


— 
- 


2 


1753 


Canton 


71 


1 


— 


- 


- 


72 


Carlisle 


23 


- 


MT 


mm 


23 


Carver 


18 


- 


M 


MB 


- 


18 


Charlton 


- 


■c 


— 


- 


38 


38 


Chatham 


h 


- 


- 


— 


ss 


b 


Chelmsford 


13 


•= 


8^ 


— 


mu 


97 


Chelsea 


2U? 


tm$ 


2 


- 


m 


2U9 


Chester 


= Z 


- 


2 


- 


2 



Chicopee 


BOSTON 
7 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRINGFIEE 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
U63 


Clinton 


1 


— 


- 


3 


12b 


132 


Cohasset 


1 


« 


• 


as 


1 


2 


Concord 


61 


- 


- 


«* 


- 


61 


Danvers 


10 


mm 


2? 


-s 


«r 


37 


Dartmouth 


6 


90 


- 


- 


- 


96 


Dedham 


106 


m* 


war 


- 


=s 


106 


Deerfield 


13 


- 


5* 


1- 


- 


1U " 


Dennis 


1 


3 


as 


«F« 


~ 


U 


Dighton 


- 


2- 


« 


Of 


- 


2 


Douglas 


1 


*■ 


- 


e; 


? 


8 


Dover 


11 


- 


1 


- 


- 


12 


Dracut 


19 


- 


7^ 


~ 


- 


9U 


Dudley 


1 




-r 


1 


lib 


116 i 


Duxbury__ 


2 




-' 


4 


- 


2 


I 

1 J 

East Longmeadow 


■ 




I 


- 

38 


MB 


38 


Easthampton 


3 


- 


- 


13 


«* 


16 


Easton 


35 


« 


— 


mi 


** 


35 


Everett 


369 


— 


2 


- 


- 


371 


Fairhaven 


k 


129 


- 


«ar 


— 


133 


Fall River 


20 


2552 


1 


ear 


« 


2573 


Falmouth 


7 


57 


it 


« 


(Ml 


6b 


Fitchburg 


15 




mi 


-* 


53 


68 


Foxboro 


32 


nr 


£ 


M 


- 


' " 3k 


Framingham 


160 


— 




« 


U6 


206 


Franklin 


iW 


- 


- 


ay 


? 


21 


Freetown 


- 


3 


ava> 


- 


- 


3 




IB 


aV 


- 


Mr 






Gardner 


7b 


92 


Georgetown 


- 


av 


1 


m> 


w 


1 


Gloucester 


i&i 


a* 


SB- 


- 


*Bt 


185 


Goshen 


- 


a? 


ar 


1 


M, 


1 


Grafton 


3- 


« 


!<* 


— 


135 


13b 1 


Granby 


- 


*w 


— 


19 


— 


19 


Greenfield 


m , 


yj 


— 


9 


mV 


9 


Groton 


i 


~ 


— 


— 


Mi 


1 


Hadleyj 


i 
— 


<B j 


; 




MS 


2 


Hamilton 


7- 


- 


k 


-i 


MF 


11 


Hampden 


- 


— 


** 


if 


MK 


1 ' k 


Hanover 


22 


- 


- 


«• 


Mf 


22 


Hanson 


11 


6 


— 


_ 


— 


17 


Hardwick 


- 


- 


ar 


4 


it 


n 

i 


Harwich 


9 


3 


a* 


Bf 


«er 


12 


Hatfield 


3 


•= 


— 


as 




3 


Haverhill 


h5 


mm 


399 


- 


1 ! W.5 




Hingham 

Holbrook 

Holden 

Holland 

Hochliston 

Holyoke 

Hopedale 

Hopkinton 

Hudson 

Hull 



Ipswich^ 



Kingston 



Lakeville 

Lancaster 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Leicester 

Lenox 

Leominster 

Leverett 

Lexington 

Leyden 

Lincoln 

Littleton 

Longmeadow 

Lowell 

Ludlow 

Lynn 

Lynnfield 



Maiden 

Manchester 

Mansfield ! 

Marblehead' 

Marion 

Marlborough 

Marshfield 

Mattapoisett 

Maymard 

Medfield 

Medford 

Medway ( 

Melrose 

Mendon 

Merrimac 

Methuen 



Middleborough 


BOSTON 

h 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRINGFIELD 


WORCESTER 

- 


TOTAL 
k 


Middleton 


2 


- 


£ 


- 


— 


k 


Milford 


2b 


— 


«*• 


sr 


150 


176 


Millbury 


- 


S3 


m 


* 


70 


70 


Millis 


1 


fSS 


— 


— 


— - 


1 


Milton 


3r 


mm 


OV 


- 


•* 


1 


Monson 


- 


m* 


_ 


3 


- 


3 


Montague 


h 


m 


«■■ 


1 


- 


5 


Nahant 


2 


... 




a* 


: 


2 


Nantucket 


1 


w 


air 


«r 


■* 


1 


Natick 


115 


<» 


M 


«.■ 


-• 


115 


Needham 


^3 


«. 


_ 


■— 


- 


53 


New Bedford 


76 


1106 




— 


- 


1183 


Newburyport ~| 


8 


•s 


i "^ . i 


- 


— 


5 


Newton 


721 


se 


i "8" 


** 


«r 


729 


Norfolk 


1 




— 


*» 


** 


1 


North Adams j 


- 


m 


.. 


la 


- 


13 


North Andover 


- 


m 


119 


- 


- 


119 


North Reading 


1 


M 


6 


3U 


* 




Northampton 


h ~ 


- 


«v 


- 


L 


k 


Northborough 


2 


am 


« 


sr 


120 


122 


Northbridge 


- 


m, 


*r 


- 


¥6 


1*6 


Northfield 


- 


ml 


M 


2 


tmt 


2 


Norwell 





rS 


_ 


<m 


- 


~8 


Norwood 


153 


— 


i 


— 


— 


15U 


Norton 


mm 


' ' B - 




— 


— 


8 


Orleans 


1 


MB 




T ,~ ' 


St 


l 


Otis 


«■* 




1 


i» 


- 


5 " 


Oxford 


- 


«• 




- 


65 


65 - " 


Palmer 


1 


- 


«* 


3k 


- 


3S 


Paxton 


- 


■ar 


— 


* 


29 


29 " 


Peabody 


2U7 


Mr 


15 


- 


- 


262 


Pembroke 





- 


tfV 


mUT 


- 


8" 


Pepperell 


2 


« 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Pittsfield 


23 


- 


3 


13 


2 


Tl — 


Plainville 


- 


- 


- 


Mr 


2 


2 


Plymouth 


7 


3 


6 


m 


MS 


16 


Plympton 


y 


«» 


* 


- «.- 


- 


3 


Princeton 


- 


— 


-r 


**? 


20 


20 


Province town 


3 


- 


*■• 


- 


- 


3 


Quincy 


290 


- 


li 


- 


— 


29tt ' 

















Randolph 


BOSTON 
6U 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SFRINGFIELI 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
61* 


Rayharc 


8 


6- 


- 


■= 


- 


11* 


Reading 


27 


- 


2 


« 


- 


29 


Rehoboth 


- 


2 


- 


- 


— 


2 


Revere 


172- 


- 


1 


■■c 


= 


173 


Rochester 


- 


5 


- 


« 


«r 


5 


Rockland 


20 


mt 


- 


- 


- 


20 


Rockport 


11* 


■c 


•a 


- 


- 


11* 


Rowley 


1 


- 


» 


- 


- 


1 


Rutland 


Mri 


- 


— 


- 


36 


36 


Salem 


153 


- " • 


i* 






157 


Salisbury 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


Saugus 


hb 


J 


- 


- 


* 


1*8 


Scituate 


96- 


- 




-_ 


- 


96 


Seekonk 


- 


16 


«v 


-- 


mm 


16 


Shardn 


2k 


•ar 


* 


- 


- 


21* 


Sheffield 


- 


- 


- 


1- 


- 


1 


Sherborn 


17 


-c 


=s 


a* 


- 


17" 


Shirley 


1 




— 


- 


5 


6 


Shrewsbury 


- 


- 


- 


- 


221 


221 "~ 


Somerset 


1 


133 1 


— 


- 


«* 


131* 


Some rvi lie 


91*2- 


— 


— 


- 


- 


91*2 


So, Hadley 


- 


— 


=■ 


H9 


- 


U9 


Southborough 


- h 


— 


- 


- 


15 


19 


Southbridge 


11 


- 


- 


— 


137 


lid 


Southwick 


ar 


— 


mm 


3* 


- 


" 38 


Spencer 


- 


— 


- 


- 


66 


66 


Springfield 


..." 29 


tme 


3 


2395 


- 


21*27 


Sterling 


<= 


■a 


— 


- 


1 


1 


Stockbridge 


- 


- 


— 


2 


- 


2 


Stoneham 


72 


- 


- 


M 


- 


72 


Stoughton 


1*7- 


2 


3 


- 


- 


52 " 


Stow 


i 


« 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Sturbridge 




SB 


tm 


=■ 


25 


' 28 


Sudbury 


17 


■r 


— 


me 


2: 


19 


Sunderland 


1 


=r 




— 


— 


1 


Sutton 


- 


= 


— 


SB 


5 


5 


Swampscott 


27 


- 


a 


■= 


_ 1 


27 


Swansea 


- 


55 


" 


— 


55~ 


Taunton 


1? 


5& 


or 


*V 


- 


77 


Temple ton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 , 


10 


Tewksbury 
Topsfield 


20 


am 


31 


* 




51 


1* 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1* 


lying sborough 


- 


- 


10 


- 


_ 


10 


Uxbridge 


1 




- 


- 


1*7 


1*8 

















\ 



WORCESTER TOTAL 




Wakefield 

Walpole 

Walthara 

Ware 

Wareham 

Warren 

Watertown 

Wayland 

Webster. 

Wellesley 

Wellfleet 

Wenham_ 

West Boylston 

W. Brookfield 

S. Springfield 

W. Stockbridge 

We s thorough 

Westfield 

Westford 

Westminster 

Weston 

Westport 

Westwood 

Weynouth 

Whitman 

Wilbrahani_ 

Willi amstown 

Wilmington 

Winchester 

Winthrop 

Woburn 

Worcester 

Wrentham 






■ 



H 3&JBW 

M H 



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